Maurits Impostri
zodiacsociety:

The Young Libra

zodiacsociety:

The Young Libra

hexappealclothing:

Pull me in EVERY directionwww.hexappealclothing.com

hexappealclothing:

Pull me in EVERY direction
www.hexappealclothing.com

visualizingmath:

cherry-merchant:

Sierpinski transformation

fractal,

visualizingmath:

cherry-merchant:

Sierpinski transformation

fractal,

namesofthedead:

My head and neck by @mattblacktattoo #divinecanvas #blackwork

namesofthedead:

My head and neck by @mattblacktattoo #divinecanvas #blackwork

sskateboard:

cagrialkan:

cagrialkan

Urban/skate/graff blog

sskateboard:

cagrialkan:

cagrialkan

Urban/skate/graff blog

dailycube:




Cube#333
Title: Endless floor of cubes
Material: Animation / gif / blender
Year: 2014

dailycube:

Cube#333

Title: Endless floor of cubes

Material: Animation / gif / blender

Year: 2014

merlin-spin:

Greco

what if that is not his car?
…lol

merlin-spin:

Greco

what if that is not his car?

…lol

neurosciencestuff:

Researchers Discover the Seat of Sex and Violence in the Brain
As reported in a paper published online today in the journal Nature, Caltech biologist David J. Anderson and his colleagues have genetically identified neurons that control aggressive behavior in the mouse hypothalamus, a structure that lies deep in the brain (orange circle in the image). Researchers have long known that innate social behaviors like mating and aggression are closely related, but the specific neurons in the brain that control these behaviors had not been identified until now.
The interdisciplinary team of graduate students and postdocs, led by Caltech senior research fellow Hyosang Lee, found that if these neurons are strongly activated by pulses of light, using a method called optogenetics, a male mouse will attack another male or even a female. However, weaker activation of the same neurons will trigger sniffing and mounting: mating behaviors. In fact, the researchers could switch the behavior of a single animal from mounting to attack by gradually increasing the strength of neuronal stimulation during a social encounter (inhibiting the neurons, in contrast, stops these behaviors dead in their tracks).
These results suggest that the level of activity within the population of neurons may control the decision between mating and fighting.  
The neurons initially were identified because they express a protein receptor for the hormone estrogen, reinforcing the view that estrogen plays an important role in the control of male aggression, contrary to popular opinion. Because the human brain contains a hypothalamus that is structurally similar to that in the mouse, these results may be relevant to human behavior as well.

neurosciencestuff:

Researchers Discover the Seat of Sex and Violence in the Brain

As reported in a paper published online today in the journal Nature, Caltech biologist David J. Anderson and his colleagues have genetically identified neurons that control aggressive behavior in the mouse hypothalamus, a structure that lies deep in the brain (orange circle in the image). Researchers have long known that innate social behaviors like mating and aggression are closely related, but the specific neurons in the brain that control these behaviors had not been identified until now.

The interdisciplinary team of graduate students and postdocs, led by Caltech senior research fellow Hyosang Lee, found that if these neurons are strongly activated by pulses of light, using a method called optogenetics, a male mouse will attack another male or even a female. However, weaker activation of the same neurons will trigger sniffing and mounting: mating behaviors. In fact, the researchers could switch the behavior of a single animal from mounting to attack by gradually increasing the strength of neuronal stimulation during a social encounter (inhibiting the neurons, in contrast, stops these behaviors dead in their tracks).

These results suggest that the level of activity within the population of neurons may control the decision between mating and fighting.  

The neurons initially were identified because they express a protein receptor for the hormone estrogen, reinforcing the view that estrogen plays an important role in the control of male aggression, contrary to popular opinion. Because the human brain contains a hypothalamus that is structurally similar to that in the mouse, these results may be relevant to human behavior as well.

d3lt4:

Optical Print III (60x80 cm)

d3lt4:

Optical Print III (60x80 cm)